The Most Unexpected Personal Possessions People Bequeath to Loved Ones

Unexpected Personal Possessions

Everyone is familiar with the suspenseful moment in movies where a will is read and some incredibly wealthy relative bequeaths their entire estate to the dog, or grandchild, or family friend. These scenes may come off as far-fetched, but everyone someday will need to create a last will and testament.

Your personal possessions do not follow you into the afterlife, so it is important to decide where they will go and to who. As you wonder about the making of your own will, or perhaps helping someone else with theirs, take a look at some of the more interesting things people passed down after passing.

Unique Personal Possessions Passed

If you’re in the process of making your own will and testament, it’s a good idea to look into estate planning services instead of just writing some notes on a piece of paper and calling it a day. When you leave a will there is a lot of planning and fine print to go over to make sure your affairs are in order.

Special Gifts from Beyond the Grave

Many people leave special notes in their will to give friends and family small gifts after their death. Jack Benny ordered a single rose to be delivered to his widow every day after his passing, an order executed from his will.

There are plenty of stories like this including letters to be given at a certain time after death, and other unique cases. Many of these bring joy and love back into the lives of those who lost a loved one.

All the Riches in the World

Some of the classic examples of weird wills are those who snubbed family. Leona Helmsley, a billionaire, left 12 billion to her dog, cutting out some grandchildren. And Keith Owen, upon passing, left his millions to a favorite vacationing spot.

Money is often the first thing people think of in connection with a will and testament. They expect the estate planning attorney to divvy it all up at the reading, but it’s not always money that’s distributed.

Something to Remember Me

Considering most anything owned (and theoretically not owned) can be listed in a will, the reading of a will can become a strange affair. Some, including Napoleon Bonaparte, have given their hair away in their will. And this has sometimes noted the mustache specifically.

Will What You Will

People leave all kinds of personal possessions behind, so it only makes sense to want to give them a place to go once we’re gone. Although many things end up in estate sales, there are plenty of things given with great care through the reading of a will.

Whether you use your will to give, to get back at, or to keep away, it’s a good idea to plan ahead. No one can predict the future, but no doubt your friends and family will be grateful if you do not leave things unplanned. And if you found this interesting, check us out for more.

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About the Author: Andrea Parker

Andrea Parker is a reporter for Zobuz. She previously worked at Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Andrea is based in NYC and covers issues affecting her city. In addition to her severe coffee addiction, she's a Netflix enthusiast, a red wine drinker, and a voracious reader.