Catholic Booster’s Growing Popularity Reveals a Catholic Church in Need of Hope

Catholic Booster’s Growing Popularity Reveals a Catholic Church in Need of Hope 1

Catholic Booster’s Growing Popularity Reveals a Catholic Church in Need of Hope

The humanitarian work of the Church mainly helps those who need and are not members of the Church. There are many people in almost any community in the world who have difficulty meeting their basic needs. The Church seeks to help as many as possible. Catholic Booster was formed by Ryan Bilodeau in response to the closure of public Masses around the country. That church closure seems to be continuing for a little while longer:

The Catholic Bishops of Ohio have extended the suspension of all publicly celebrated Masses and liturgies until May 29. This decision was made after Governor Mike DeWine laid out a timeline to gradually reopen the state. According to the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, they are hoping everyone can publicly celebrate the Solemnity of Pentecost on the weekend of May 30 and 31. Bishop George Murry dispenses Catholics from being obligated to attend Sunday Mass during this time.

Because many of the faithful lack their access to the Eucharist, Ryan started the Catholic Booster website in order to bring some spiritual edification at this time. In using the booster shot analogy, Catholic Booster attempts to serve as a sort of spiritual vaccine for people around the world. And with 5000 individual readers since its inception, Catholic Booster seems to be a hit with readers young and old alike.

“I’m really humbled by the growth the website has experienced in less than a month. I wish that Masses were public again (provided that social distancing was possible) and there wasn’t even a need for the website at all. Hopefully this epidemic soon comes to an end, and we can receive Jesus once again in the Eucharist,” said Catholic Booster author Ryan Bilodeau

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About the Author: Khurram Raheel Akbar

Khurram Raheel Akbar is a reporter for Zobuz. He previously worked at Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Raheel is based in PAK and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe coffee addiction, he's a Netflix enthusiast, a red wine drinker, and a voracious reader.