Final Fantasy VII Remake, the game that will make you cry with emotion

Final Fantasy VII Remake, the game that will make you cry with emotion 1

During the Madrid Games Week fair we tried one of the most important video games of 2020 and the sensations could not be better

Last weekend, the 2019 edition of Madrid Games Week, the most important Spanish fair in the videogame industry, was held at IFEMA. Undoubtedly, one of the titles that raised the most expectation was Final Fantasy VII Remake which, as the name implies, is the redesign from scratch of the Japanese role-playing game that changed this genre in the first Play station in 1997. It will hit the market on 3 March 2020 (PS4) and the lines to try their first playable demo in Spain were huge.

And the sensations during the test were sensational. From the title screen, with the first notes of the arpeggio that form the brilliant Crystal Theme by composer Nobuo Uematsu, to the final screen. In the demo we could test the combat system during one of the first stages of the game in which we must blow up a reactor in the city of Midgar, driving the protagonist Cloud and his partner Barret. Random fighting has gone down in history, and now we see the enemies (soldiers) during our journey to the target. Once there, the combat system is shown in full and large.

And it is that the combat was one of the main questions of the title since its announcement. The lovers of the system in turns (like the one who writes these lines) were in the expectation to check the level of fidelity with the original and the changes that would involve adapting it to the prevailing action in the present times. And the case is that it works really well. We handle our character freely with the possibility of changing a partner at any time; we can perform normal attacks in real time and the action freezes when we select the new special strokes or the classic spells like Piro, Electro or Ice.

A mixed system that seems to start from the final fantasy XV system, but which has evolved for good.In addition, the gigantic mechanical enemy that we face at the end also served to verify the usefulness of ranged attacks, coverage with elements of the battlefield and the spectacular limit blows, which could not be missed. And it remains to be seen the announced classic system, which could get even closer to the original. To put a but we will talk about dubbing, which unfortunately will come in English, although the texts will be in Spanish. In any case, fans were delighted after trying it.

In addition to Final Fantasy VII Remake at Madrid Games Week we were able to try other titles yet to come out as Call of Duty Modern Warfare (October 25, PS4, Xbox One, PC), which promises many shots in contemporary battles with huge maps, Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot (January 16, 2020, PS4, Xbox One and PC), Goku’s new role-playing game and company with spectacular open-world fighting and the nostalgic Medievil Remastered (October 25, PS4). Without playable demo but with video presentation, attendees also enjoyed with Death Stranding (November 8, PS4) the new creation of Hideo Kojima (Metal Gear) that has its followers quite confused about its theme, The Last of Us Part II (February 21, 2020, PS4) and Cyberpunk 2077 (April 14, 2020, PS4, Xbox One, PC and Stadia) a dystopian adventure full of cyber implants and freedom to tackle their missions. Final Fantasy VII Remake Date Change Could Impact Pre-Orders Made Through The Square Enix Website

But Madrid Games Week is much more than news to leave. It also featured a retro zone with arcade or pinball machines, virtual reality spaces, competition area and even a television reality show (Top Gamers Academy) in the style of Operation Triunfo where three you tubers will sponsor 24 applicants to professional players. They will also enter an academy and we can follow their adventures 24 hours through the Twitch online platform. And of course we could buy video games, both novelties and classics for Amstrad, Super Nintendo or Mega Drive, real jewels for collectors that were available, for example, at the stand of ‘The corner of the retro’.

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About the Author: Khurram Raheel Akbar

Khurram Raheel Akbar is a reporter for Zobuz. He previously worked at Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Raheel is based in PAK and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe coffee addiction, he's a Netflix enthusiast, a red wine drinker, and a voracious reader.