Managing Cat Sensitivities: A Guide

Managing Cat Sensitivities: A Guide

Cats are the second most common pet in Australia, with around three out of every four homes owning one. Cats are also delicate pets, implying that providing them with enough care is a challenging task. Cats in the house don’t simply mean unending play; they also like scratchiest!

Cats are recognized as royalty’s pets and are considered a symbol of elitism. It is common knowledge that domestic cats are incredibly picky animals who require the finest of both worlds. Cats are prone to food and skin conditions due to their sensitivity. Markets have recognized this, and sensitivity-based cat food is now available. This type of food is designed to help our furry friends eat healthily and stay happy!

The air of royalty around cats is what makes them lovable! However, being cat parents, it is critical to know the allergies that can infect them and how to handle them.

Common Allergies:

  • Skin Allergies: Skin allergies in cats can be caused by infected fleas, environmental exposures, and food diets. Mites and ringworms are common causes. Flea bites are particularly common in cats who spend more time indoors. These are biological responses to the saliva of the flea. Pollen, dander, dust particles, and fungal exposure cause allergies in cats who spend more time outside. Cats with skin allergies can be discovered by inspecting their skin. They will lose a considerable amount of hair. Itching, ulcers, and open wounds will also be present in cats. When you try to touch them, they may over-groom or shriek. These are symptoms that the cat is in pain or dissatisfied.
  • Food Allergies: Cats develop food allergies when they eat foods they haven’t been exposed to since they were kittens. According to studies, cats are frequently sensitive to certain meats, such as fish. Further, they are allergic to grains like corn and wheat. However, this is highly individualised and breed-specific. You must be aware of the distinctions between food allergies and food sensitivities. While food allergy is a reflex to new types of foods, the latter is an adverse response that cats develop to the food they’ve had all their life. Food allergies are inextricably linked to and lead to skin allergies. It is marked with cats experiencing year-round discomfort and itching in their underarms, groin, paws, cheeks, etc.

Ways to Combat Allergies:

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your cat begins to develop allergies. They frequently recommend that people switch to additional hydrolysed proteins or different protein sources in their diets. Allergic reactions can be combated in the following ways:

  • Hypoallergenic cat food is an effective dietary recommendation for cats with allergies. This kind of food does not lead to well-known cat allergies, as the name implies.
  • They often only include one type of protein, such as lamb or deer.
  • They don’t have any grains in them, such as maise or wheat.
  • They’re accessible both in stores and online.
  • They are reasonably priced. They’re also available in gluten-free, grain-free, and single protein isolate combinations to help your cat feel better.
  • Hypoallergenic cat food is frequently seen in hypoallergenic diets that also include hydrolysed proteins. These proteins have been broken down to the utmost extent possible so that your cat will have no trouble digesting them.

Bathing the cat is another way to relieve allergy symptoms. There are several other cat-specific strategies as well. With domestication, cats tend to develop specific soothing techniques and objects that can distract the cat from the allergy until medical assistance is sought.

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About the Author: Hannah Gilbert

Hannah Gilbert is a freelance writer who offers to ghostwrite, copy writing, and blogging services. She works closely with B2C and B2B businesses providing digital marketing content that gains social media attention and increases their search engine visibility.