The expansion of Rap and Hip Hop

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The expansion of Rap and Hip Hop

What circumstances helped the rather marginal musical and cultural practices of a neighborhood like the New York Bronx expand worldwide in just a decade, between the late 80s and 90s of the last century?

Many people confuse rap with hip hop. They are two different things! When you talk about rap, you talk about a presenter and a DJ. When you talk about Hip Hop, you talk about graffiti, you talk about break dance, you talk about DJs, and you talk about presenters, the way you dress, the way you talk, all the elements in one. That is Hip Hop. Indeed, the spread of Hip Hop is linked to the culture of graffiti, break-dance, social denunciation and a type of music starring the DJs along with the phenomenon of scratch.

Grand Mixer DXT, another of the protagonists of the time (from the 70-80 in New York), believes that many people do not understand what really happened then: Because hip hop was the prelude to rap, before people it will rhyme in the discs.. As long as they had a percussion machine, having the rapper and his voice, the record labels didn’t want the DJ anymore. The DJs made the presenters but then they were left with power and many turned away from the cultural, going to ‘everything for pasta. At this point we can ask ourselves: how is it possible that a marginal music of peripheral neighborhoods in New York from the 60s and 70s, with a majority of population of African or Latin origin and with a high index of social marginality … ignited in a short time in many cities in so many areas of the planet?

The culture associated with Hip Hop has something authentic, which focuses primarily on its character of reporting social injustices. But there is a dose of primitivism, simplicity, low sophistication, or formal development and complexity in rap and hip hop. And this is extensible to the strictly musical, to the lyrics of rap, to the steps of dance (break), and to the forms of graffiti culture. Was it that simplicity that facilitated that he turned on so directly in a population sector, especially adolescent, masculine and in good part (not always) of marginalized social classes?

There is another matter that personally also catches my attention: the radicalism of the discourse. The lyrics of his songs often display a nihilistic background message: If on the one hand his lyrics denounce unfair social situations – here is his component of authenticity – on the other hand it is often a complaint that offers no solutions, he stays in awareness but does not propose solutions or hopes. There is a background of disenchantment. This has many nuances, for example in areas of Latin America such as Chile and Argentina we have seen young rappers whose lyrics convey a beautiful desire for social integration, initiatives to help other young people, warning of the dangers of drugs, etc.

The large-scale dissemination of the culture of Hip Hop and Rap in the 80s and 90s leads us to consider the media power of the film industry and the large record companies, a phenomenon that began to grow especially since the 70s. Interesting to study the role played by certain products, such as the film Wild Style by Charles Ahearn. We personally did a search in this regard. And we found revealing data. In this article it is appeared that the 25th anniversary of the appearance of Wild Style, the genesis of this production is remembered. Its title is already revealing in itself.

NEW YORK EMERGING RAPPER VENCHI HEF

Venchi Hef is a rapper who looks like a New York City artist. He also stands out from the rejoicing lyricism of Venchi, a talented young artist whose highly innovative music constantly advances. When Venchi grows rapidly and his music is heard worldwide in the era of the social media. Venchi seems to have improved the way he chooses to publish songs of higher quality. A song entitled Preseason recently published! Venchi Hef seems very interesting at this point. What else this new artist has to say, we look forward to rock the world through social media.

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About the Author: Khurram Raheel Akbar

Khurram Raheel Akbar is a reporter for Zobuz. He previously worked at Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. Raheel is based in PAK and covers issues affecting his city. In addition to his severe coffee addiction, he's a Netflix enthusiast, a red wine drinker, and a voracious reader.