4 Avant-Garde Watches You Need To Add To Your Collection This 2020

4 Avant-Garde Watches You Need To Add To Your Collection This 2020 1

For watch connoisseurs out there, getting an avant-garde watch may be the difference between a boring collection and an inclusive and interesting one. In this article, we’ve narrowed down your best options:

Bell and Ross Instruments

When what you’re looking for are modern and edgy military watches, you’ll never go wrong with a Bell and Ross Instruments watch. The company, which was the brainchild of two friends, has seen success not only locally but among the most revered watch enthusiasts in the world. The brand, which was founded in 1992, is no contender against the heritage of some of the oldest Swiss watch brands, but it certainly can hold its own when it comes to the actual timepieces.

The Bell and Ross aesthetic is focused on the rounded square case, which is in itself, an icon. The Skeleton model within the collection with a reference number BR-05 is not only a curious watch to sport every day, but it also accentuates the wearer’s personal style. You get an automatic mechanical movement, polished satin steel for case and bracelet, and a skeleton dial.

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore

If you want a Royal Oak Offshore in your wrist, you’ll need to have a deeper pocket. The Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore is not a cheap watch. And if you can’t afford to shell out at least $20,000, then it’s not the watch for you. If you’re an enthusiast, though, this is a great investment timepiece. It’s also an avant-garde piece, and when you have it on your wrist, you’ll be sure to get stares and questions.

For the uninitiated, the Royal Oak Offshore is a tourbillon chronograph. That means it has the two best complications known in a watch. It’s also outfitted with top of the inhouse line movement, a self-winding automatic mechanical number with a water-resistance of 100m. You also get a sapphire crystal, stainless steel bezel and case, and black ceramic screw-locked crown, as well as push-pieces.

Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope

Let’s get one thing straight – the Max Bill Chronoscope from German watchhouse Junghans is a stunning watch. It exudes peak Bauhaus aesthetic, from the domed sapphire crystal, the 3 PM date and day, slim and tapered watch hands, and minimal design elements in the dial. The while and red color scheme and the pure black and muted yellow gives the watch an otherworldly finish.

What’s avant-garde about the Max Bill Chronoscope is it can be worn with distressed leather strap without looking like it’s out of place. What you get instead is a vintage-inspired look that harkens back to a time where wristwatches were all the rage. Under the hood, you get an inhouse caliber movement as well, water-resistance of 50m, and a stainless steel case.

A Lange & Söhne Perpetual Tourbillon

Another exceptional German watchmaker, A Lange $ Söhne has been in the business for quite some time now. It can go toe to toe with Patek and Audemars in terms of heritage, and there is quite the number of historical evidence that the company is the country’s premier watchmaker. Any watch connoisseur will tell you that A Lange & Söhne watches will certainly diversify your collection.

And if it is the perpetual tourbillon you’ll be getting, trust and believe that anyone with a knowledge of watches will give you their nod of approval. There are only two models in this reference, both featuring a manual-winding mechanical movement. It also has a moon phase display and a chronograph so you’re getting a stacked timepiece!

Takeaway

Avant-garde timepieces are great additions to any collection because they make things interesting. When you’ve been collecting for quite some time now, it’s natural to skew into one favored aesthetic. That’s why getting an avant-garde watch is a necessity!

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About the Author: Barry Lachey

Barry Lachey is a Professional Editor at Zobuz. Previously He has also worked for Moxly Sports and Network Resources "Joe Joe." he is a graduate of the Kings College at the University of Thames Valley London. You can reach Barry via email or by phone.