SUSTAINABLE FISHING CHARTER

SUSTAINABLE FISHING CHARTER

SUSTAINABLE FISHING CHARTER

Explore the coastal area of ​​Pensacola on this half-day excursion through the rivers and bays of the region. With the supervision and advice of your guide, catch local fish such as tripletail, flounder, redfish and trout. You’ll visit some of the best secret fishing spots you won’t find on your own, at the bottom of the hinterland waterways.

The captain provides fishing instructions and molding lessons which are all included for beginners and advanced techniques for experts. The excursions are suitable for beginners, experienced fishermen, the elderly, young people, families and children of all ages and are suitable for the disabled. So everyone is sure to have an explosion when you fish with the ease and comfort of calm backwater don’t worry about getting seasick. Fish comfortably in our boats over 22 feet, which can accommodate a maximum 6 people plus the captain, and are equipped with GPS and fishponds to keep your catch.

On the water, the boat will have an on-board cooler with ice and bottled water to keep you hydrated. There is a lot of’ space to bring sandwiches or your favorite extra drink. Alcoholic beverages in cans are allowed. The trip always includes the use of rods, reels and bait, bait, lures and fishing licenses. The legal sockets will also be cleaned and packaged for you at the end of the day. Note: All charters are subject to weather conditions. In case of bad weather, you will have the possibility to postpone or reimburse.

The legal sockets will also be cleaned and packaged for you at the end of the day. Note: All charters are subject to weather conditions. In case of bad weather, you will have the possibility to postpone or reimburse. The legal sockets will also be cleaned and packaged for you at the end of the day. Note: All charters are subject to weather conditions. In case of bad weather, you will have the possibility to postpone or reimburse.

THE PROPOSED SOLUTION: A referendum “Yes to sustainable fishing” would allow responsible citizens to legally oblige their respective states to embark on this path by enshrining this principle in their constitution.

THE SUSTAINABLE FISHING CHARTER:

The foundations of sustainable fishing will be identified and drafted by all stakeholders and then assembled in the PENSACOLA FISHING CHARTER which will form the basis of the referendum question.

THE CONTEXT: the Pensacola has already implemented the principle of sustainable fishing and its methods of application at domestic level: In 2012, the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (CSTEP / STECF) clarified the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management.

Like an expert system, this involves describing all the stakeholders in the fishery, and being able to predict the best possible policies, which means monitoring their implementation and to make an annual assessment with a high degree of precision. This principle is now enshrined in European Law (EU 1380/2013), Article2). It is included in the even broader framework of the Framework Directive “Strategy for the Marine Environment” of 2008.

Describe all stakeholders in the fishery

  1. First of all, it describes the fish themselves, which undergo the fishing activity: fish harvesters are scientists, who analyze, describe and model the state of health of the 14 European ecosystems, located by “zones »Plotted on European waters maps. Below the fishing “zones” as currently delimited by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES / ICES) with their numbering, and the correspondence with the names of the seas more familiar to each of between us.

We must then describe the Men, starting with their fleets and their gear, which – paradoxically – seems even more complicated than the previous task. There are 15 member states fishing in Europe, there are tens of thousands of fishing boats, there are dozens of different fishing gears, boats can use several different gears in the same season, see the same During the day, the fishing “zones” are home to dozens of different fish stocks and they are caught by several floats that land in different ports.

All of this requires determining and modeling the environmental and socio-economic impacts in accordance with article 17 of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). These works are then gathered in an ecosystem and bio-economic model capable of simulating the effect of various options of the CFP: in summary, a real expert system capable at all levels (regional, national and European) of showing the right path in scrupulously respecting the Maximum Sustainable Yields (RMD or MSY in English), the stumbling block of good management.

Make the precise annual assessment of the past season

This assessment and all of the above presuppose systems for collecting all these data which are the responsibility of the states and whose efficiency is fundamental for the success of the principle of sustainable fishing. Title XII of the regulation (EU 1224/2009) details these systems which seem to leave nothing to chance (Article 109 of the CFP) and the most recent regulation (EU 1380/2013) even calls for a “culture of respect.

The member states of the European Union are responsible for the implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy which they themselves have decided. In view of the impressive arsenal of provisions to control, inspect, measure and enforce the rules, we understand that the business is not simple. Indeed, the dysfunctions are numerous and the examples against the French government are not lacking. This site recalls some of which:

Do not believe that France would be the only state to behave like this: for example, Spain, the heavyweight of European fishing, is widely criticized (see the Greenpeace file). It would even be easier to draw up the inverse list of virtuous countries which correctly apply the CFP. Could the list even be blank?

Refocus and expand skills at regional and local level: the representativeness of the National Committee for Maritime Fisheries and Marine Fish Farming must be restored for the benefit of small-scale coastal fishing, scientists and civil society must take an integral part in the management of regional fishing (citizens, NGOs, consumers), all these stakeholders must be able to refine the rules locally.

The training received by future professional fishermen should no longer be limited to the techniques used by boats (navigation, propulsion and gear), it must urgently extend to the concepts of resource conservation and fragile ecosystems to allow fishermen to understand the rationale for the transition to sustainable fishing.

Fishing control “must no longer be negotiated with the profession, it must be permanent and ubiquitous, fines must be dissuasive, calculated on the percentage of activity and not fixed and symbolic. Involving all citizens will considerably improve its efficiency and reduce the cost. In the area of ​​recreational fishing, controls must no longer ignore certain cases of illegal fishing known to all in each port of coast.

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About the Author: Barry Lachey

Barry Lachey is a Professional Editor at Zobuz. Previously He has also worked for Moxly Sports and Network Resources "Joe Joe." he is a graduate of the Kings College at the University of Thames Valley London. You can reach Barry via email or by phone.