Tips for Being a Supportive Employer

Supportive Employer

Being an employer and making it to the top of the corporate ladder is a major achievement that many people aspire to, but for all its perks, there are drawbacks, too. It’s not all fun and games at the top, with many people struggling the most with managing others. Your employees and team members become your responsibility, and that’s no mean feat.

You need to ensure you’re not only completing your personal work duties, but that you’re motivating your employees to be productive and perform at their best whilst, all whilst making sure you’re able to offer them the support they need for in and out of office circumstances.

It’s not easy to support your employees, especially if you’re new to management or being an employer. If you’re struggling, here are some top tips you can use to be a more supportive employer and ensure the wellbeing and morale of your staff is looked after.

Regular Catch Ups

The first thing you should be looking at in order to be a supportive employer is engaging in regular catch ups with your staff. There are multiple reasons why this is something you should be doing, including because it shows your employees that you’re so far above them that you’re not interested in their work.

They will have the opportunity to air potential grievances they have with you, to raise any concerns they might have about their job or workload, and to inform you of where they’re at with things. Not only this, but it gives you the opportunity as an employer to get an insight as to how things are in the thick of it, and to help your employees in the capacity they need you. By asking them directly and communicating regularly, you’ll be more informed and best placed to offer support when its needed.

Tips for Being a Supportive Employer 1

Financial Support

One of the biggest ways you can support your employees is to offer financial support. There has been a lot of emphasis on financial support in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and questions surrounding when does furlough end and what will employers do to support their staff. This is down to the employer and their financial standing, but there are other ways outside of the pandemic you can be providing financial support.

This means paying your team members a fair wage, and a competitive one at that. If they’re paid enough, not only will they be able to live more comfortably and hopefully avoid financial stress, but they will feel more valued and be more likely to stay. This should increase your staff retention levels and have a positive impact on work output as a whole, but your benefit isn’t the only thing that should be considered.

Interval pay rises should be considered, and if you are asking a colleague to do more work, back it up with more pay. You may also find that most of your employees will greatly appreciate paid sick leave. This will provide them with a financial buffer if they become ill, and this is a great way to show that you support your employees.

Comprehensive Benefit Packages

Being a supportive employer extends further than pay and feedback sessions. You should be looking at other ways you can provide support. This may include giving your employees a gym membership so they can look after themselves physically, or providing health insurance and dental packages so that they can be supported health-wise.

Staff nights out and day-out events are great for allowing your team to let their hair down, and giving a good annual leave package is also a great idea to show that you support your team having time away to recharge and do more of what they love with who they love.

Summary

This is by no means an exhaustive list of how to be a supportive employer, but these three basic tips should help you to prove to your team that you’re there for them. We hope you find them useful!

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About the Author: Barry Lachey

Barry Lachey is a Professional Editor at Zobuz. Previously He has also worked for Moxly Sports and Network Resources "Joe Joe." he is a graduate of the Kings College at the University of Thames Valley London. You can reach Barry via email or by phone.